MARCH 18, 2018

Like fingernails grating against a chalkboard, the words “Change you can believe in” send a chill darting down the spine of many. Change implies something has become different, but not necessarily better. Most politicians base their campaign strategy on the need for change. They highlight the failures of their opponent and boldly proclaim, “A vote for me is a vote for change!” Yet history reminds us of what the Bible teaches, all things continue as they were from the beginning of the creation (2 Peter 3:4). 

If any real change for the better is to occur, it must come from a source more powerful than that which is in need of change. When we read in 2 Corinthians 5:17, if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature, it is a strong statement of change. The key ingredient to facilitate change is found in the words in Christ. All lasting, genuine, substantive change for the better is found in Christ. The words “self-help” are possibly the most deceiving of all words. Some like to say, “The power to change is within us all.” However, I submit that the power to change is only found in Christ. We will naturally continue to follow a course that is consistent with all of mankind – downward. Do you desire to be better tomorrow than you are today? There is only one source that can provide for it. As we gaze into the holy perfection of Jesus Christ, He becomes our true source of “change you can believe in.”

But we all, with open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord. 2 Corinthians 3:18

– Dr. Jeff Redlin


February 4, 2018

We often use the expression, “An inch deep, and a mile wide” to define something (or someone) that appears colossal, but actually has very little depth. At times, this expression may have fit the church, the very bride of Christ. For example, the church is often involved in many varied activities. Exercise programs, mom’s day out, kid’s sports programs, community service, political awareness, youth activities and so on fill the calendars and, admittedly, touch the lives of numbers of people. From a casual observer, it appears that the impact of the church is far and wide.

However, upon closer evaluation, we might find there can be, at times, little depth, although much activity. Busyness can be nothing more than a mask behind which believers hide. Was Jesus busy? We may safely conclude He was. But, His busyness was focused, purposeful, fruitful, and connected to the advancement of the Kingdom.

His reach into the lives of 12 men may have seemed limited, even shortsighted, but those men eventually “turned the world upside down.” No, there were no massive invitations, few headlines, and even fewer who “forsook all” to follow Him. But His work was anything but “an inch deep and a mile wide.” Let’s pour our lives into that which truly matters. We may even find we are far more focused, and much more fruitful.

~ Dr. Jeff Redlin


January 28, 2018

One of life’s challenges is being misunderstood. When someone accuses us of a position, motive, action or whatever doesn’t accurately represent our real intentions, we nd it exceptionally frustrating. e same must have been the case with Job and his three “friends.”

While Job maintained the position that he was, in fact, walking with God, his friends completely misunderstood all God was actually doing. As the book unfolds, you can sense Job’s exasperation with his inability to help his friends understand. At one point, Job simply said:

But he knoweth the way that I take: when he hath tried me, I shall come forth as gold. (Job 23:10)

The simple words, “He knoweth” must have provided wonderful solace for Job, even during the height of being misunderstood. Every attribute of God has the potential to add wonderful blessing and comfort to those who are rightly positioned with Him. Because Job knew of his own personal relationship with God, he could take comfort in the fact God knew the way Job was taking, even when no one else did. While others may have mischaracterized, misrepresented, and misunderstood Job, between Job and God, there was no misunderstanding.

~ Dr. Jeff Redlin